Creativity and Play

Video Project extension 2of3: Dynamically updating annotation

Crowd-sourced Annotation: this interface allows users to interactively post and view notes in community video and graphically delineates the more popular or repeated content. This will allow people to more easily “skim” through academic content-based videos to the most pertinent sections. One main finding from the trials I’ve completed is the need for easy “blessing” of videos, so that students who view can assign trust or not.

Video Assignment project extension 1of3: AutoGrader for Videos

Video AutoChecker: this interface uses computer vision algorithms to read the answers provided in the video. Students would need to somehow indicate or signal to the program that they have submitted an answer. For example, a box drawn around particular text (along with annotation provided in the program) could signal the algorithm to look at the contents inside the box.
The computer vision aspects of this project may be too ambitious at this time but similar systems could be developed that require students making videos to signal when they are covering something noteworthy (like an answer to a subsection of the problem).

This post will be further edited as more information is made available, but feedback is welcomed. Advice is specifically requested from students with knowledge in the realm of computer vision. This could be an interesting class project!

Flipping @ Tech

Beginning research has been done to determine the potential impact of asynchronous video on teaching and learning in today’s science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) face-to-face classroom. The notion of “flipping the classroom” made popular by Salman Khan and described in his recent Ted Talk (http://www.ted.com/talks/salman_khan_let_s_use_video_to_reinvent_education.html) has been in schools of varying levels. Even professors at the Georgia Institute of Technology have replaced some class time with more interactive time by having students watch videos of the instructor (or another credible source) deliver the lecture (Prof Jim Foley taught a section of the HCI course CS 6750 using web-lectures). These videos, it is suggested, are beneficial for several reasons:

1. the students can watch at their own pace and pause/rewind/fast-forward when desired

2. the students can watch in the location/setting that best facilitates their learning

3. the videos can be re-used (sustainability at its finest)

4. portion of the videos can be edited so as to replace particular content without having to re-produce (or redo production) of the entire segment

As we move forward with the Georgia Tech Strategic Plan, it will be interesting to see the extent to which this form of learning is utilized at Tech, very much traditional in its educational mindset.

Flipping @ Tech- extensions of an extension of the idea (metaextended)

The last post referred to the notion of “Flipping the Classroom” by having students watch the lecture portions outside of class and participate in engaging activities during. One modification of this idea involves a reversal of the production-source. Video assignments can be given to students such that they (and not their profs) have the responsibility of creating the educational content. Links to these videos would be the deliverable, instead of the traditional pen and paper, or even the “standard” electronic submission. Three interface options now present themselves as extensions to this idea:

1. AutoGrader for video submissions: In 600 student Physics courses, how can the prof, even with the help of a few TA’s, hope to watch every video?

2. Crowd-sourced Annotator: would there not be value in a tool that allowed people to leave comments and/or notes within the videos, with the most commonly posted content algorithmically “rising to the top”?

3. Variable Playback Speed: ever watch an educational video and want to simply “skip to the good part”? Wouldn’t it be cool to have a speed dial that allowed you to crank up the speed on the boring parts of the problem presentation, while still allowing you to see and hear the content (just sped up a bit)? 

Flipping @ Tech

Beginning research has been done to determine the potential impact of asynchronous video on teaching and learning in today’s science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) face-to-face classroom. The notion of “flipping the classroom” made popular by Salman Khan and described in his recent Ted Talk (http://www.ted.com/talks/salman_khan_let_s_use_video_to_reinvent_education.html) has been in schools of varying levels. Even professors at the Georgia Institute of Technology have replaced some class time with more interactive time by having students watch videos of the instructor (or another credible source) deliver the lecture (Prof Jim Foley taught a section of the HCI course CS 6750 using web-lectures). These videos, it is suggested, are beneficial for several reasons:

1. the students can watch at their own pace and pause/rewind/fast-forward when desired

2. the students can watch in the location/setting that best facilitates their learning

3. the videos can be re-used (sustainability at its finest)

4. portion of the videos can be edited so as to replace particular content without having to re-produce (or redo production) of the entire segment

As we move forward with the Georgia Tech Strategic Plan, it will be interesting to see the extent to which this form of learning is utilized at Tech, very much traditional in its educational mindset.

Coca-Cola designs a collaborative “Beatbox” for London 2012

In keeping with the theme of the last class 

http://www.smartplanet.com/blog/design-architecture/coca-cola-designs-a-collaborative-8220beatbox-8221-for-london-2012/6084?tag=mantle_skin;content